Spring Gardening

Although there is still snow in the yard, there are some hopeful signs that spring will eventually get here. The ladybugs are waking up from their long winter sleep (diapause). The one I found looked pretty groggy. And when I pulled back some snow and leaves, I found the sweet woodruff already growing. Hooray! This plant is a real trooper so far, even though I often see it rated only to zone 5. A good snow cover and a little mulch seems to do the trick, and it's nice to see some green in the garden so early.


With the beautiful weather we've been having, I couldn't resist starting to plant the garden. I know a late cold snap could come and decimate my seedlings, but I guess the same part of me that always thinks I'll win a contest believes that they'll grow. I planted sugar snap peas, spinach, lettuce, corn salad, beets and green onions. I carefully planted two short rows of each, and my two-year old threw handfuls of seeds in between. I then covered everything up, and immediately forgot where I planted everything. Now we sit back and wait!

7 comments:

  1. Cassandra, when do you begin to clear away the mulch & dead stuff out of your beds? I wouldn't want to risk killing some of my zone 4 perennials by exposing them too early. I wouldn't be surprised by one of those infamous Edmonton spring cold snaps.

    All my out of zone perennials did great, including Key Lime Pie & Curly Red heuchera.


    Thanks,
    JJ

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  2. Hi JJ,
    Great to hear your heucheras made it! This winter wasn't too extreme, and we had good snow cover.

    As soon as you see your perennials starting to grow, it's probably a good idea to pull the mulch back so that enough light gets to them. Then if there's a cold snap, just cover them back up for the night. I probably won't pull all the mulch out of my beds until about the beginning of May.

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  3. It's been a great week for gardening, with the warm days, and the snow melting. Like you, I've removed some of the leaf mulch, but keep it handy too, for the cold snaps we are sure to get still.

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  4. Thanks. I'll try that as well.
    On another note, have you ever had crushed saplings survive?

    I planted two young goldenlocks elders in the fall and the mailman trampled them cutting through the yard over winter.

    All branches were broken, as was the main stem.

    Think they may recover?

    JJ

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  5. I'm not sure about your saplings, JJ. They might grow back from the roots, especially if it's something that tends to sucker. All you can really do is wait and see, I guess.

    You might want to stick a 2x4 with a flag on top next to them next year, to keep the mailman away when they're covered in snow.

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  6. Ha! That's pretty much what they would have needed. The rocks I put around to protect them didn't work worth a darn.

    No match for Canada Post!

    JJ

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  7. Well I'll be....the golden elders are growing back. I've moved them to a safer location and will put stakes & chicken wire around them so they don't get trampled again.

    They were hard to find, so I'm really happy!

    JJ

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